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Bearing State Honours

Chapter VIII of the Law on State Honours

(As amended on 15 April 2010, amendments taking effect 1 May 2010)

 

Section 62.  State honours shall be borne in according with the following rules:
 

1)  The rosette-shaped miniatures of honoured civilians, the pieces of ribbon and miniature medals of honour of military personnel, as well the small versions of medals of commemoration may be borne on an everyday basis and for holidays.  The stars, crosses and ribbons of orders, as well as the miniature orders, are borne only on state holidays or ceremonies, with the appropriate apparel.
 

2)  Military personnel shall bear their orders, miniatures of orders, and medals of honour of orders at official events, with the appropriate apparel.
 

3)  Persons who have received honours from other countries shall bear them in accordance with the statutes of the relevant honour, also taking into account procedures referred to in Section 67 of this law.
 

Section 63.  The order in which state honours are to be borne is as follows:
 

1)  The Order of Three Stars;
 

2)  The Order of Viesturs;
 

3)  The Cross of Recognition;
 

4)  The Medal of Honour of the Order of Three Stars;
 

5)  The Medal of Honour of the Order of Viesturs;
 

6)  The Medal of Honour of the Cross of Recognition;
 

7)  The memorial medal for participants in the 1991 barricades;
 

8)  Honours from other countries.
 

Section 64. (1)  The Order of Three Stars, Order of Viesturs and Cross of Recognition shall be borne by Commanders of the Great Cross as follows:
 

1)  Gentlemen – on a ribbon across the right shoulder, with the great star on the left side of the chest;
 

2)  Ladies – on a ribbon across the right shoulder, with the great star on the left side of the chest.
 

(2)  The Order of Three Stars, Order of Viesturs and Cross of Recognition shall be borne by Grand Officers as follows:
 

1)  Gentlemen – on a ribbon around the neck, with the small star on the right side of the chest;
 

2)  Ladies:  A ribbon tied into a bow on the left side of the chest and the small star on the right side of the chest.
 

(3)  The Order of Three Stars, Order of Viesturs and Cross of Recognition shall be borne by Commanders as follows:
 

1)  Gentlemen – on a ribbon around the neck;
 

2)  Ladies:  A ribbon tied into a bow on the left side of the chest.
 

(4)  The Order of Three Stars, Order of Viesturs and Cross of Recognition shall be borne by Officers on a rosette on the left side of the chest.
 

(5)  The Order of Three Stars, Order of Viesturs and Cross of Recognition shall be borne by Bearers on a ribbon on the left side of the chest.
 

(6)  The Medal of Honour of the Order of Three Stars, Order of Viesturs and Cross of Recognition shall be borne on a triangular piece of ribbon on the left side of the chest.
 

(7)  Recipients of the Grand Cross of the Cross of Recognition and Grand Commanders of the Cross of Recognition so recognised prior to 28 February 2011, shall bear the honours as follows:
 

1)  Commanders of the Great Cross – the central cross of the order on a ribbon at a width of 110 mm, to be carried across the right shoulder, with the large cross on the left side of the chest;
 

2)  Grand Officers – the great cross of the order on the right side of the chest.
 

(8)  Persons who have received the large or small Medal of Honour related to the Cross of Recognition carry the medal on a 32-mm ribbon worn around the neck.
 

Section 65.  After a person receives a higher class or medal of honour than the one received before, the lower class or medal shall no longer be borne.
 

Section 66.  (1)  Where a person has received more than one order, the star of the higher order shall be placed first, while others shall be placed under it in a slanted line toward the inside, taking into account the rules referred to in Section 63 of this law.  The ribbon of the highest-ranking order shall be worn over the shoulder.
 

(2)  Orders shall be borne on the left side of the chest so that the order or medal of honour that is at the centre of a line of orders is at the middle of the left side of the chest, taking into account the rules referred to in Section 63 of this law.
 

(3)  Where orders cannot be arranged in a row, they can be overlapped in the sense that the highest order slightly covers up a lower order, taking into account the rules referred to in Section 63 of this law.
 

(4)  Only the most important order among those that are borne on a ribbon that is worn around the neck shall be carried.  Other orders shall be borne in accordance with the statutes of the relevant order and the procedure referred to in this section of the law.
 

(5)  Pieces of ribbon related to orders and medals of honour shall be borne on the left side of the chest, just like orders and medals.  These may be arranged in several rows.
 

Section 67. (1)  Persons upon whom honours have been conferred by other countries may accept them, but they may bear them in public only with the permission of the President.  This permission is not necessary for persons who have received state honours during state visits, or for members of the National Armed Forces who have received such honours while under active duty.
 

(2)  Persons who have received honours from another country and wish to bear them publicly shall so inform the Chapter of Orders within three months’ time after the conferral of the honours.  The relevant individual shall state the name of the honours, the country in which they were conferred, and the date upon which they were conferred.  A copy of the diploma attached to the honours shall be appended to the information.
 

(3)  An announcement of the conferral of honours from another country and permission to bear them in public shall be published in the newspaper Latvijas Vēstnesis.
Section 68.  Persons upon whom state honours have been conferred may depict the order on their personal seals, jewellery, documents or letterhead, or make other use of the image of the order, provided that all due respect toward the honours is guaranteed.