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Andris Bērziņš

 

Patronages

The Big Cleanup

  

Latvian President Andris Bērziņš met with organisers of the Big Cleanup on November 7, 2011.  The tradition was launched by the previous President, and President Bērziņš agreed to become the patron of the event.  He suggested that the goals and missions of the Big Cleanup should be more concentrated on ensuring a clean living environment while, at the same time, facilitating public responsibility for a clean environment throughout the year, not just in the context of individual campaigns.

 

On March 23, 2012, Latvian President Andris Bērziņš took part in a meeting of co-ordinators of the Big Cleanup, calling on each person in Latvia to take care of order and cleanliness in his or her own home and its surroundings, not just during the Big Cleanup, but also on an everyday basis.


The Big Cleanup was held on April 21, 2012, and the President joined together with employees of the Presidential Chancery to weave osier protective walls along the so-called Slow Mile, thus strengthening the coastline and ensuring that it is not eroded away during natural disasters and stronger periods of wind.


According to organisers of the Big Cleanup, a total of 3,118 tonnes of waste were collected on April 21 – nearly 500 tonnes more than last year.  There was considerably greater involvement among local residents this year than in the past – 210,000 people took part in the Big Cleanup.  The most active region was Vidzeme, followed by Latgale and Zemgale, with far fewer participants in Kurzeme.


On May 24, 2012, President Bērziņš met at the Rīga Castle with the organisers and supporters of the Big Cleanup to thank them for their major and selfless work in organising and co-ordinating this year’s Big Cleanup.

 

President Andris Bērziņš met on February 15 with organisers of the Big Cleanup event, which will take place on April 20 this year. The President praised the slogan of the event, “A Clean Latvia Begins in Your Mind,” also suggesting ways in which to reach those people in Latvia who live in a different information space and speak a different language on an everyday basis. This, said Mr Bērziņš, is necessary because the goal of cleaning up Latvia is one which all residents share.
 
President Bērziņš joined the Big Cleanup together with employees of the Presidential Chancery and the people of Cēsis to establish several hiking trails to the Gauja River in that town on April 27.
 
According to the data collected by the organizers of the Big Cleanup, approximately 85,000 people participated in the Big Cleanup in 2013. There were 1,357 clean-up sites formally applied, but a number of registered clean-up sites exceeded a number of marked contaminated sites for the first time in the history of the Big Cleanup.
 
On 7 January 2014, the President of Latvia Andris Bērziņš met with the organizers of the Big Cleanup to discuss plans and intentions of the clean up this year and to express his vision of the objectives to be attained as the patron of the Big Cleanup.
 
The President of Latvia Andris Bērziņš and the Foreign Minister of Canada John Baird participated in the Big Cleanup and planted forest in Tuja on the coast of the Baltic Sea on 26 April 2014.
 
On 8 December 2014, the President of Latvia Andris Bērziņš met with the organizers and sponsors of the Big Cleanup to discuss the previous contribution for improving Latvian environment and future clean-up events jointly that would take place on 25 April 2015.
 
On 25 April 2015, in the framework of clean up and landscaping work, the patron of the Big Cleanup, the President of Latvia Andris Bērziņš planted trees and decorative shrubs together with the employees of the Chancery of the President of Latvia and their family members in Rauna Park near the Rauna School.
 
In his turn, the President of Latvia Andris Bērziņš met with the organizers and supporters of the Big Cleanup on 6 May 2015 to thank them for the important work and contribution they made for the benefit of our country.


The idea of the Big Cleanup is based on voluntary participation in a programme aimed at cleaning up the environment, but also creating a sense of consolidation, positivism and a job well done.  The originator of the Big Cleanup was writer Anna Žīgure, who borrowed the idea from Estonia, where people organised the first major environmental cleanup on May 3, 2008.


 
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